His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej was jazz musician, artist & inventor

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Bangkok (AP) — Aside from his kingly duties — and they were immense — Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej took time during his 70-year reign to compose music (and jam with some of the world’s jazz legends), paint surrealistic oils and have some 20 patents registered for an assortment of inventions.

His Majesty the King sits with his beloved adopted stray dog Khun Thongdaeng in Bangkok Monday, December 2, 2002.
His Majesty the King sits with his beloved adopted stray dog Khun Thongdaeng in Bangkok Monday, December 2, 2002.

Here’s a look at some of the avocations pursued by the beloved Thai monarch, who passed away earlier this month at the age of 88:

Musician

“He is simply the coolest king in the land,” declared American jazz great Lionel Hampton of His Majesty King Bhumibol’s talent on the saxophone.  The Thai king also played clarinet, trumpet and the piano, often with his own palace band, and one of the highlights of a 1960 visit to New York was a two-hour jam session with Benny Goodman.

Largely self-taught, he is credited with nearly 50 compositions, including a three-movement ballet previewed in Vienna and songs that are still frequently heard in Thailand, including “Falling Rain” and “Candlelight Blues.”  Six of his songs were included in a 1950 Broadway musical, “Peepshow,” with one, “Blue Night,” described by one critic as a “sensuous beguine.”

Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej (right) plays the saxophone during a jam session with legendary jazz clarinetist Benny Goodman (left), drummer Gene Krupa (second left), and trombonist Urbie Green in New York, July 5, 1960. (Bureau of the Royal Household via AP)
Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej (right) plays the saxophone during a jam session with legendary jazz clarinetist Benny Goodman (left), drummer Gene Krupa (second left), and trombonist Urbie Green in New York, July 5, 1960. (Bureau of the Royal Household via AP)

Artist & Author

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His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej was 8 when he got hold of his first camera — a Coronet Midget given by his mother — and rarely was one out of reach through most of his life, capturing both domestic scenes and documenting his efforts to improve rural lives.

His Majesty the King was a lifelong keen photographer, receiving his first camera at the age of 8 as a gift from his mother. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
His Majesty the King was a lifelong keen photographer, receiving his first camera at the age of 8 as a gift from his mother. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)

The King’s more than 60 sculptures and paintings range from traditionally realistic to expressionistic and abstract.  Some are starkly contemporary.

“This is called ‘Subversion’ — there is greed, anger and evil.  I painted it with a knitting needle,” he said of one.

In this Sept. 22, 1935, file photo, ten-year-old King Ananda Mahidol of Siam (right) stands with his brother Prince Bhumibol, while playing with presents including a science kit he received on his tenth birthday, in Lausanne, Switzerland. (AP Photo)
In this Sept. 22, 1935, file photo, ten-year-old King Ananda Mahidol of Siam (right) stands with his brother Prince Bhumibol, while playing with presents including a science kit he received on his tenth birthday, in Lausanne, Switzerland. (AP Photo)

The King also penned several books, including one about a beloved stray dog that he had adopted, “The Story of Thongdaeng.”

Inventor

Having tinkered since childhood and studied some science and engineering in Switzerland, the King came up with inventions throughout much of his reign, with 20 patents and 19 trademarks registered under his name and some garnering international awards.

H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej and six friends formed “probably the most intricately gadgeted orchestra in Europe,” regularly meeting at his Lausanne villa to play until the dawn hours. The neighnors never complained.
H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej and six friends formed “probably the most intricately gadgeted orchestra in Europe,” regularly meeting at his Lausanne villa to play until the dawn hours. The neighnors never complained.

Pondering how to prevent annual flooding in Bangkok, he recalled from childhood pet monkeys munching on bananas and then retaining the food in their cheeks to later swallow.  The King’s “monkey cheeks” initiative featured building reservoirs on the periphery of Bangkok into which onrushing water was diverted and later flushed into the sea or used for irrigation.

His other inventions included a bio-fuel derived from palm oil and the low-cost Chaipattana aerator, which resembles a paddle wheel on old steamers and can be inserted into rivers, canals and marshes to counter water pollution.  The aerators can be seen across Thailand, including at the royal residence in Bangkok.

People queue up to buy a copy of “The Story of Thongdaeng,” written by His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej about a stray dog he adopted. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
People queue up to buy a copy of “The Story of Thongdaeng,” written by His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej about a stray dog he adopted. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

A 2005 European patent, number 1491088, describes a technique for seeding clouds to induce rain over drought-stricken areas.  Dubbed the “super sandwich,” pilots disperse environmentally friendly chemicals to form cool and warm clouds at different altitudes.