Recovered COVID-19 patient in Pattaya donates plasma to create antigens for others

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Pol. Lt. Col. Arut Sapanan, a traffic inspector from Pattaya Police Station who recently recovered from Covid-19, donates plasma to help people affected by the third coronavirus wave.

A traffic inspector from Pattaya Police Station, recently recovered from Covid-19, donated plasma to help mitigate the third coronavirus wave.

Pol. Lt. Col. Arut Sapanan on June 10 visited the Thai Red Cross Society’s Blood Donation Center to donate blood.



Arut was diagnosed with Covid-19 in the middle of April this year and spent 14 days in the hospital. During his stay, he learned how recovered patients could donate plasma, which could create antigens to use against the virus.

After doctors determined he was recovered on May 1, Arut contacted the Thai Red Cross Society on Facebook and learned that after 28-days and a test showing the virus was gone, his blood would have sufficient levels of Covid-19 antibodies.

Traffic inspector Arut was diagnosed with Covid-19 in the middle of April this year, and spent 14 days in the hospital.

Dr. Yong Poovorawan M.D., Head of the Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine at Chulalongkorn University’s Facebook page, states that blood from recovered patients contains Covid-19 antibodies that can attack the virus to help Covid-19 patients. A recovered patient can donate plasma up to six times. The donated blood can be kept for a year and can be used to create serum used in treatment.

Although the number of newly infected patients has reduced in Thailand, plasma is very important and is needed by the Thai Red Cross Society for treatment for current Covid-19 patients. Also, the plasma can be used for Covid-19 vaccines in the future.

Arut donated over 500cc of blood. He encourages all recovered patients who are healthy to donate plasma at the Thai Red Cross Society.

While recovering in hospital, Arut learned how recovered patients could donate plasma, which could be used to create antigens against the virus, so he contacted the Thai Red Cross Society.


Arut has his blood pressure checked as part of his medical exam deeming him healthy enough to donate blood.