Troublesome macaques at Khao Wang Park in Petchaburi set to be relocated

0
2212
According to Petchburi Governor Natthachai Nampoonsuksan, there are currently around 3,000 macaques in the capital district alone, and between 1,000 and 1,500 in each of the other districts, with the numbers continuing to grow.

A significant number of macaques at Phra Nakhon Khiri, also known as Khao Wang Park, in Petchaburi province, are set to be relocated due to the issues they have caused for residents, businesses, and visitors as they roam in search of food.

According to Petchburi Governor Natthachai Nampoonsuksan, there are currently around 3,000 macaques in the capital district alone, and between 1,000 and 1,500 in each of the other districts, with the numbers continuing to grow.



While the Protected Area Regional Office 3 of the National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department previously attempted to control the population with a sterilization program, it has proven to be ineffective. As a result, a plan is being developed to relocate the macaques from Khao Wang to a more suitable location.


While the governor has not disclosed a specific relocation site, locals suggest an island in the Kaeng Krachan Dam as a potential new habitat.

While the governor has not disclosed a specific relocation site, locals suggest an island in the Kaeng Krachan Dam as a potential new habitat. Macaques have been known to cause disturbances in the community, with residents and tourists reporting break-ins to homes and shops in search of food.



Additionally, the animals carry diseases like scabies that can lead to respiratory problems. Business owners have also reported issues such as strong odors from monkey urine in public areas and accidents caused by macaques crossing roads.

Park officials said relocating the macaques to a more suitable location will provide the animals with a better environment for them to thrive without posing a threat to humans. (NNT)

Macaques have been known to cause disturbances in the community, with residents and tourists reporting break-ins to homes and shops in search of food.