Pattaya Sports Club now uses World Handicap System

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What are the main changes using the WHS in Pattaya?

The PSC Handicap Index is calculated by averaging the best 8 differential scores of your most recent 20 rounds. (In the past it was calculated by taking the average of the 10 best differential scores and multiplying by 0.96.)

The daily playing handicap is further adjusted by adding the Course Rating and subtracting the Course Par. (In addition to the normal Slope calculation i.e. Handicap Index x Slope / 113) Note: this is a big change!



The daily playing handicap for both men and women will be capped at 54. (It used to be 28 for men and 36 for women. Tournament organisers can impose lower limits at their discretion)

Playing Conditions Calculations will not be used at this time. The World Handicap System suggests adjusting score differentials to better reflect a player’s performance on a given day due to extreme weather conditions or problems at the course. This can only be done with a large number of scores at that course on that day to give the statistical weight to the calculations. (In view of the small turnouts we are experiencing in Pattaya, the PSC has no immediate plans to implement PCC.)


The maximum score that can be posted for any hole is net double bogey. This replaces the old Equitable Stroke Control method and is equivalent to a max score of zero Stableford points. (Calculated for each hole using its index and the individual’s daily playing handicap.)

This allows for comparing results in multi-tee and mixed gender competitions. (Ladies & Seniors can join in the same competitions as the men, playing from their respective Red or Silver Tees.)

The World Handicap System relies on players posting their scores as soon after the round as possible, preferably within 24 hours of playing the round. Definitely before playing another round especially in a tournament. (A player’s Handicap Index is recalculated with every score posted. Posting late could lead to penalties.)



More Details

New daily playing handicap formula = (PSC Handicap Index x Slope Rating / 113) + Course Rating – Course Par

Examples:

  1. Your handicap index is 15.2 and you are playing a course with a Slope of 124, rating of 69.5, and par 72.

First apply the Slope calculation to your Handicap Index: 15.2 x 124 / 113 = 16.68. Then add the rating and subtract the par: 16.68 + 69.5 – 72 = 14.18. Then round to the nearest whole number = 14.

  1. Your handicap index is 15.2 and you are playing a course with a Slope of 120, rating of 71.5, and par 70

First apply the Slope calculation to your Handicap Index: 15.2 x 120 / 113 = 16.14. Then add the rating and subtract the par: 16.14 + 71.5 – 70 = 17.64. Then round to the nearest whole number = 18.

What else is new using the WHS in Pattaya?


Soft Caps and Hard Caps

The caps are a suppression mechanism that limits any increases in a player’s Handicap Index when a player is going through a spell of poor form. These caps are also intended to prevent sandbagging by people posting high scores to boost their Handicap Index in preparation for an upcoming tournament.

They are only calculated when new scores are posted and they are performed by comparing a player’s new calculated Handicap Index with the player’s Lowest Handicap Index (LHI) over the previous 12 months.



The Hard Cap

When posting a score that would lead to an increase of 5.0 or more in a player’s Handicap Index over the LHI the increase will be capped at exactly 5.0. This cap being applied pre-empts any need to calculate the soft cap below.

The Soft Cap

When posting a score that would lead to an increase of between 3.0 and 4.9 in a player’s Handicap Index the increase will be capped so that any increase above 3.0 strokes is cut in half.


Examples:

A player’s Low Handicap Index over the previous 12 months is 14.5.

  1. On posting his latest round the calculation returns a new Handicap Index of 20.2 (an increase of 5.7) – this results in a Hard Cap being applied and a new Handicap Index of 19.5.
  2. On posting a score that would lead to a new Handicap Index of 18.3 (an increase of 3.8), a Soft Cap would be applied resulting in a new Handicap Index of 17.9 (addition of 3.0 plus 50% of 0.8 for a total of 3.4)




Exceptional Score Reduction (ESR)

The ESR is a procedure for handling certain low scores which may indicate the player’s true ability. The ESR rule considers all scores and not just tournament scores. It is there to quickly adjust the Handicap Index for the “bandit” who just came in with 43 Stableford points or better.

When a player posts a score that is 7 or more strokes better than their Handicap Index would predict at the time the round was played then an exceptional score reduction is made. The adjustment starts at -1 but increases to -2 if the score is more than 10 strokes below.


The adjustment is made to the score being posted and to up to 19 of the player’s previous scores. This results in an automatic adjustment of the players Handicap Index, which will slowly work its way out of his record as he posts more normal scores. Future ESR adjustments are cumulative which results in further reductions in Handicap Index.

The great thing about this is you won’t actually need to understand or apply any of the mathematics. The PSC software will do all the calculations for you. The calculation is done immediately after a score is entered, so you can just look it up on the App or the Website to find out what your latest Handicap Index at any time.

Play by the rules and post all scores promptly to enjoy the best handicapped sport in the world.