The Grand Palace and Temple of the Emerald Buddha to reopen to visitors from June 4

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The Grand Palace and Wat PhraKaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) in Bangkok.
The Grand Palace and Wat PhraKaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) in Bangkok.

Bangkok – The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) would like to provide the latest update that the Grand Palace and Wat PhraKaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) in Bangkok will be reopened Thursday, 4 June, 2020.



The update was posted on the Royal Office website (https://www.royaloffice.th/en/2020/05/25/the-grand-palace-will-normally-be-open-on-june-4-2020/).

TAT understands that the reopening will be under strict health and safety measures to control and prevent the spread of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Therefore, when visiting the Grand Palace and Wat PhraKaeo, TAT would like to remind all to stay safe through this difficult time and follow the health and safety recommendations by keeping social distancing, wearing a mask or cloth mask, and frequently washing hands.

About the Grand Palace

The Grand Palace complex was established in 1782, and it consists of not only royal and throne halls, but also a number of government offices as well as the renowned Temple of the Emerald Buddha. It covers an area of 218,000 square metres and is surrounded by four walls, 1900 metres in length.

After King Rama I the Great ascended the throne in 1782, the Palace was built. Prior to this, the royal palace and centre of administration had been located in Thon Buri, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River.


For various reasons, the new King considered the former capital to be unsuitable and decided to establish a new capital on the other side of the river.

By his royal command, a palace was built to serve not only as his residence, but also as the site of administrative offices. The royal compound has been known since then as the Grand Palace. The two earliest buildings erected within the complex were the Dusit Haha Prasat Throne Hall and the Phra Maha Monthian.

For more information, please visit https://www.royaloffice.th/en/the-palaces/(tatnews.org)