Buyers empowered on rejecting poor-quality and mismatch goods ordered online

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Prime Minister’s Office Minister Jiraporn Sindhuprai made the announcement, explaining that the new policy aims to give buyers greater control over the acceptance of online purchases.

Thailand has introduced a new directive that will empower buyers to reject goods ordered online using the cash-on-delivery (COD) method. This change, intended to protect consumers, was published in the Royal Gazette last week and will take effect on October 3. The directive allows consumers to refuse goods at the time of delivery or to return them shortly afterward.

Prime Minister’s Office Minister Jiraporn Sindhuprai made the announcement, explaining that the new policy aims to give buyers greater control over the acceptance of online purchases. The decision has been made in response to recurring complaints about the quality of goods and discrepancies between ordered items and those delivered.


The directive has a 90-day lead time to implementation to allow logistics companies and sellers adequate preparation for the changes. This period is intended to help these businesses adjust their operations to accommodate the new rules without disrupting service.

The need for such a directive stemmed from numerous incidents where buyers received poor-quality goods or items they did not order. Conflicts often occur at the point of delivery, with logistics staff insisting that buyers must pay for goods before inspection, leaving them to settle any disputes with the sellers. (NNT)