Bangkok campaigns for smoke-free and vape-free schools

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In recognition of the upcoming World Anti-Drug Day on June 26, the BMA, in collaboration with the Thai Health Promotion Foundation (THPF), is organizing the 2024 annual anti-drug campaign at the Bangkok City Hall.

High schools under the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) have declared their commitment to becoming smoke-free and vape-free institutions.

This campaign aims to raise awareness about the dangers and harmful effects of smoking and vaping, emphasizing the need for all related parties to monitor and prevent youth from falling into these habits.



In recognition of the upcoming World Anti-Drug Day on June 26, the BMA, in collaboration with the Thai Health Promotion Foundation (THPF), is organizing the 2024 annual anti-drug campaign at the Bangkok City Hall.

The event features exhibitions and discussions highlighting the dangers of drugs, especially cigarettes and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), which are increasingly popular among children and adolescents. E-cigarettes are often considered a gateway to other drug use.



Data presented during the discussion revealed that a survey of students aged 13-15 (junior high school) showed that 17%, or approximately one in five students, had tried e-cigarettes.

The appearance of e-cigarettes has evolved, causing misconceptions about their safety. Nicotine in e-cigarettes adversely affects health, particularly in children and adolescents, damaging the brain and lungs and weakening lung immunity. It also destroys lung alveoli, impairing gas exchange and causing increased fatigue. The cardiovascular system is affected, leading to hardened arteries, poor blood circulation, and potential heart attacks.




Moreover, secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is harmful. Research shows that non-vapers exposed to e-cigarette vapor have three times the risk of bronchitis compared to those not exposed, even if they do not vape themselves.

Vaping also increases addiction and does not help users quit traditional cigarettes.

Additionally, a survey by the Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection, Ministry of Justice, assessed the health behaviors of 300 youths in 39 centers nationwide.




It found that 95.4% of these youths, with an average age of 17, had smoked cigarettes, with 84.5% smoking daily.

Moreover, 79.3% had used e-cigarettes, with 30.5% vaping daily. This information highlights the need for increased awareness among children, youths, and parents about the dangers of smoking and vaping.

Today’s event also saw the declaration of BMA-affiliated schools as smoke-free and drug-free zones, with representatives from over 100 schools and more than 400 students participating. (TNA)