120,000 year-old fossilized tree trunk in Tak, north Thailand, sets Guinness World Record

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According to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, the log was found in 2003 in Doi Soi Malai National Park in the Ban Tak district sitting at a length of 72.22 meters, or the height of a 20-story building.

A 70-meter-long petrified log discovered in Tak province has set a Guinness World Record for the world’s longest fossilized tree trunk.

According to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, the log was found in 2003 in Doi Soi Malai National Park in the Ban Tak district sitting at a length of 72.22 meters, or the height of a 20-story building. A major flood at the excavation site reportedly damaged the log, resulting in the loss of one of its tips and reducing the total length to 69.7 meters.



According to ministry data, the petrified wood is approximately 120,000 years old and is of the Thong Bueng tree species (kempas) commonly found in tropical rainforests.

The Hyperion, a giant sequoia in California’s Redwood National Park, is thought to be the tallest living tree. It is approximately 65 percent taller than the petrified log discovered in Tak, measuring nearly 116 meters in height.



The petrified log, however, is taller than Thailand’s tallest known tree, which stands 64.2 meters tall and is located near Ao Kian beach on Ko Yao Noi in Phang Nga province. (NNT)