Asian University students see how Pattaya Mail works

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Nine Asian University students were given a first-hand look at how the Pattaya Mail is produced each week during an Aug. 25 study trip.

The juniors and seniors from the Faculty of Liberal Arts in English for Business Communication at the university’s eastern campus met with Pattaya Mail Publishing Managing Director Peter Malhotra as well as communications director Sue Kukarja and IT editor Paul Strachan, to hear about how the Pattaya Mail, Chiang Mai Mail, and Pattaya Blatt are produced.

Topics discussed included news gathering, writing, page production, editing, and website publishing.

“The tour of your office building was very informative. I am surprised that such a small and professional crew can produce such popular and well known newspaper on a weekly basis. I look forward to reading more of your articles,” student Andrew Agnew said. “Thank you again for the tour.”

Front row, left to right: Pattaya Mail Director of Communications Sue Kukarja greets Asian University students Irin Charoenkietkrai, Panyanuch Suksamran, Tawanshine Penthisarn, Budsayamas Cheaplam, and Punyanuch Thumatijpiroj; and back row, left to right: Teerapat Petram, Olli Oksala, Natthapol Inderasuwan and Andrew Agnew.Front row, left to right: Pattaya Mail Director of Communications Sue Kukarja greets Asian University students Irin Charoenkietkrai, Panyanuch Suksamran, Tawanshine Penthisarn, Budsayamas Cheaplam, and Punyanuch Thumatijpiroj; and back row, left to right: Teerapat Petram, Olli Oksala, Natthapol Inderasuwan and Andrew Agnew.

The study included the way to seek news information, write details, and edit stories, as well as the role of English-speaking editors and how news is sent from the field.

“I learned a lot about the steps involved in the making of a newspaper, student Olli Oksala said after the tour.” All the way from getting the stories, through translation and the selection of the right stories.”

Students can use the knowledge gained to aid their classroom study.

Participants said they gained a better understanding that producing a newspaper is a complicated process and how news and photos differed between various papers.

Olli said she learned a lot from the tour, “I really liked how you showed us the programs you use for your websites and in the process of making the actual newspaper. It was interesting to hear how you choose the stories for a weekly paper and what kind of stories the people here in Pattaya find interesting. I would have never thought that the sport events were such a big deal here. It was interesting to see the journalistic side of communication actually in work and hear about the problems that newspaper writers may face here in Thailand. I hope that the rest of our visits will be as informative as yours and that they help us to choose the right field of communication in the future. Big thanks to all of you!”