Navy popularizes storied hill on Koh Kood

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A Royal Thai Navy patrol group and Trat residents explored a storied peak on Koh Kood that to them resembles three parked warships, as well as a cave containing ancient pottery.

The squadron assigned to patrol the Thai-Cambodian border waters inspected a mountain on the large Gulf of Thailand island July 21, taking a four-wheel drive vehicle about 19 kilometers from Yai Bau Pier to scout the area.

Capt. Chaiya Tiemchayapan and a Royal Thai Navy patrol group explore a storied peak on Koh Kood. Capt. Chaiya Tiemchayapan and a Royal Thai Navy patrol group explore a storied peak on Koh Kood.

Capt. Chaiya Tiemchayapan, former border patrol commander, indeed found the peak, which he said looked like three ships parked in a row. The hill obviously was known and explored before, as a statute of Prince Chumphon, a Buddha figure and a pavilion were nearby.

Vice Adm. Chumpol Wongwekhin nonetheless saw the visit a chance to solicit government officials, navy members and residents for funds to build a temple at Wat Ratbumrung by offering robes to monks according to the Border Stability Development and Security project.

He took the opportunity to visit the “warship mountain” in the center of Koh Kood and paid his respects to the statue of the prince, considered the father of the Thai navy.

He said there has been a long-standing saying that those who have visited Koh Kood but did not visit the warship mountain and pay respects to the prince’s statue, haven’t really toured Koh Kood.

Currently, there are possibilities that navy and government officials have given importance to this finding and in the near future, tourists may be able to visit  the warship mountain and will be able to pay their respects to Sadet Tia.