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Vol. XV No. 22
Friday June 1 - June 7, 2007

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Updated every Friday
by Saichon Paewsoongnern

 

 

 

Mail Bag

 

HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Stick it to the ATM crooks

The state of Pattaya

A Welfare Disaster in the Making

How can I transfer money to Pattaya

Pioneers of the twenty-first century

Give us a Mabprachan super market

Of the people, by the people and for the people

Motorbike Insurance

Broken Guts and good medical advice

In Memoriam

Stick it to the ATM crooks

Dear Editor:
Three or four times a year we have the requisite story of some poor sod who gets his bank account emptied after using his ATM card here in Pattaya.
It can be prevented and if my instructions are followed, it has a 100 percent cure. Here is what you do:
1.  Go to any foreigner and online friendly bank (Kasikorn and Ayudha) and open two savings accounts.
2.  One savings account will have an ATM card attached and make sure the 2nd account does not. 
3.  Get online access for both accounts under the same username - This Is Important!
4.  Keep no more and no less than 1000 baht in the ATM account.  Transfer from the account with no ATM access to the account with ATM card as you need it.  Never leave more in the ATM account than you are willing to lose. 
Make sure you explain to the bank what you want so they don’t attach the ATM to both accounts.  If one of our Pattaya crooks steals or clones your card, they will only be able to touch what is in one account and you won’t leave much money there. 
The other account is your castle - it can only have money withdrawn at the teller or transferred online.
So long as you don’t use public internet shops to access your online accounts, this scheme is foolproof.
Kasikorn was the easiest to open the accounts and get both online. Ayudha Bank was ok but it required a few trips to the bank with papers to get the secondary account attached to the ATM account.  Bangkok Bank was the most uncooperative and when they finally took my paperwork for online access (demanded work permit or residence) they got it wrong. 
Stick it to the crooks by safeguarding your baht.  Editor, this should be reprinted at least every month.
Jeff Rosner
Jomtien Thani


The state of Pattaya

Having been a avid reader of Pattaya Mail both whilst on holiday in Pattaya and via the internet whilst at home in England I feel I must add my bit to the debate on the changing face of Pattaya.
It was years ago since I first discovered Pattaya and the surrounding area and I have been a regular visitor ever since, sometimes on long stays other times the annual 2-week trip.
I am happy for the Thai people that much business has come their way and a lot of local people have employment in the tourist trade, shopping malls, cinemas and international restaurants. Big hotels have all been introduced since my first visit, tourism is booming, with cheap flights and good quality accommodation plentiful.
The downside is the influx of many undesirable western men who are here opening bars and many of them are living an illegal lives. Along with the huge drug problem amongst the young Thai people, with all the violent crime that goes with it, I am afraid has turned our paradise into some kind of wild west hangout.
I fear it is too late to try and clean up the place and Pattaya will sink even further in people’s estimations.
A sad little Englishman


A Welfare Disaster in the Making

Sirs,
 I recently returned to Pattaya, my first visit to Thailand in over three years, I am stunned by the changes, most I must say for the better.  
Well done the City of Pattaya for the many improvements and for dealing with many long existing problems.
One of the biggest changes I noticed was the huge increase in old age westerners living in Pattaya. Obviously Pattaya has been very successful at attracting these people, as I myself get older I can understand some of the reasons why.
I wonder though, is the very popularity of Pattaya with old age foreigners the making of another long term and serious problem?
I’m sure that it is wrong to assume that all these old foreigners settling in Pattaya are in the peak of physical, mental or emotional fitness. I am absolutely certain that it is wrong to assume that any of them will remain that way.
Likewise, surely not all are wealthy and able to afford long term and increasing health care, nor I doubt are many married to angels willing and able to care for them during the decay of old age. Most seem to be growing old in isolated solitude.
Others seem to be ensuring their departure does not go without problems, fathering children in their sixties and older; in the almost certain knowledge that they will not be around to provide fatherhood or financial support. Of course some will, but what of those who’s folly leaves a mother with a child, no father and no income?
A population of old people of similar numbers as can be found in Pattaya would in the west be provided with a huge raft of social welfare and support, not to mention legal support that protects the interest of people who are beyond being able to protect themselves.
Surely the huge numbers of aged foreigners moving to Pattaya is a welfare disaster in the making.
Deeply Concerned
Bristol, England


How can I transfer money to Pattaya

Hello,
I just have a query & hopefully you can help me, I need to send some money to my friend in Pattaya and I was wondering which are the agencies in the area. Your help is much appreciated, thank you.
Rick


Pioneers of the twenty-first century

Dear Sir
 As the mother of a teenager who has lived in many foreign countries, I found Andrew Watson’s insights into TCK (Third Culture Kids) absolutely fascinating. I quite agree that these young people who have grown up amid various “foreign” cultures, are the future, and are indeed pioneers of the twenty-first century. I believe tomorrow’s world leaders will appear from this group of individuals. 
 My son is studying International Relations and I am quite sure that his multi-cultural background is and will help him in his life both now, and in the future.
 Thank you for having such an informative and authoritative columnist as Andrew Watson.  So many columnists procrastinate and offer unsubstantiated opinions; it is refreshing to see that Mr Watson gives his sources as well as his opinions.
Sincerely
Erica Armstrong
Pattaya


Give us a Mabprachan super market

The fast expanding area of Mabprachan desperately requires a decent supermarket, so come on Tesco Lotus, Big C or others.
We residence have to drive 10-15 kms confronting appalling traffic conditions. Our only saving grace is the 7/11 store at the top end of Soi Nerb Plab Wan…but try parking your pick-up there.
Aussie Bas.
Pong sub-district


Of the people, by the people and for the people

Sir,
In September 1945, right after the Japanese surrendered to the United States, General MacArthur, told President Truman, that it would take about six months to install a new form of government; Truman replied, “you have seven days to do it”. In seven days, a new Constitution was written and a new Democratic form of government was established. This was a formidable task, considering that Japan had been under a strict feudal system for centuries and a God-like Monarchy. This new Japanese government is still in existence today, and running smoothly after 62 years. Also, a much needed police system was completely over-hauled. Japan’s economy grew like a bamboo shoot, which is in clear evidence today, even with the normal ups-and-downs of any free economy.
This new Constitution was based upon the United States Constitution, written in 1787, 220 years ago, that has never been re-written, and has had only 26 new amendments added. So, regardless of some opinions about the USA, this speaks loudly for itself. The English Parliamentary system has been around since the Magna Carta of 1066.
In these two countries, you do not see wholesale murders and beatings of politicians, intimidation at the voting booths, and bribes or pay-offs, except in rare and isolated cases. For example, you could never bribe a Democrat to vote Republican or vice-versa, and even if you could, the numbers would be insignificant. If any reader still has a problem with the Bush/Gore election, read the Boortz report to see the real numbers. Yes, this mess in Iraq is maddening, but it will not cause anarchy or a ‘coup ‘change in the Government, and there will be no re-writing of the Constitution.
It is high time that the Thai officials abandon their lofty egos, and copy what has already proven to work, in face of very difficult situations. National religions have no place in government, and a military should never be running any country; look around at those countries who have not heeded these known facts. Time is running out for the Thai people to have a new and lasting Constitution, which professes, “by the people and for the people”.
Hyde Parke
Pattaya


Motorbike Insurance

With regards to a letter from Marc Thesmar in last weeks letter section. I can arrange cover for third party insurance for cars and motorbikes. If he would like to email me at: [email protected], I will email the quote directly to him. I will need age, make, model and engine size. Please include residential address.
Kind regards,
Richard Freestone
Coordinator


Broken Guts and good medical advice

Dear Lang Reid,
I saw your review of Anthony Aikman’s little book and thought it very well done. It was a very wise measure to have had Dr Iain’s imprimatur stamped upon the text. There is an awful lot of questionable medical advice given out “for free” these days and I’m sure that some of it is just plain wrong.
So now I know that in addition to being a charming read I can rely upon the medical advice in “Broken Guts” to lead me out of the woods and not further into them. You have done us all a good service with your review.
John Francis Lee
Chiangrai


In Memoriam

David Frederick Lee

While you are gathered together today to celebrate the life and mourn the passing of David Frederick Lee, known to us simply as Dave, there are many of his friends halfway across the world and further that join with you in this and although we cannot be with you in person, our thoughts and minds are as one with you all today and in the future as we look back over a life sadly ended too soon for us all.

Many of you, if not all, will have known Dave much longer than any of us left here in Thailand and throughout the world, but we would like to add some of our thoughts and memories of an extremely kind and generous man who has been taken from us all so suddenly.
Dave was one of the “Old School”, those that grew up in England during and shortly after the Second World War when things were rather different from the modern world that we find ourselves in today, with almost everything available only with sufficient stamps from our meager ration cards. Television was only for the mega rich and the necessity of finding and providing ones own values in the absence of those learnt from others as well as making ones own entertainment, demanded that he be “Self Taught” in many respects.
This certainly had an enormous effect on Dave’s character, which at the same time could be fervently patriotic and scathingly critical of the country, its politicians policies, both international and domestic, its national sports teams, including everything from tiddlywinks (at which England is still world champions) through Cricket, Rugby and of course Football. The latter of course included his lifetime heroes West Ham. It is particularly sad that David could not have been with us to see the magical Houdini act that they managed to pull off and confound his weekly comments following each week’s results.
We will also remember Dave’s love of “Rock and Roll” particularly his penchant for Elvis, but that is no surprise, as in his formative years together with many of his contemporaries, the early fifties and its youth cried out for some excitement and relief from the daily underpaid grind and general greyness.
With this background David always managed to bring a lot of life to the party and always interspersed it with a few well chosen pithy comments, whilst at the same time never being capable of being accused of taking himself too seriously and well able to laugh with others rather that at them.
With all the various emotions that Dave was capable of, it is his kindness and generosity that will particularly missed by us all. One only had to mention ‘that you could do with a hand’, and Dave was there with sleeves rolled up ready to go and whilst not blessed with an overabundance of funds, was always ready to chip in for a worthy and needy cause.
He would, we know, be deeply touched by the attendance of you all here today and the thoughts expressed by his friends, without a hint of pride but with a good measure of humility and surprise.
Dave will be missed, and certainly not forgotten, by all his friends here in Thailand, wherever they may find themselves both now and in the future.
Stephen Foster Beard
Pattaya
On behalf of all of his friends who could not be with you today.



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