‘White God’ sees canines bite the hands that beat them

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The acclaimed Hungarian movie “White God”, directed by Kornél Mundruczó, was screened at TK Park in Bangkok on Saturday, March 11 as part of the contemporary world film series.  The screening was supported by the Embassy of Hungary and was presided over by Hungarian Ambassador HE Dr. Peter Jakab.

This image shows a scene from the Hungarian award winning movie, White God.
This image shows a scene from the Hungarian award winning movie, White God.

The film is set in the Hungarian capital city Budapest and tells the tale of the love between a 13-year -old girl, Lili, and her half-breed ‘mongrel’ dog, Hagen.

When Lili brings Hagen along with her to live with her estranged father, he refuses to keep the dog at home and Hagen is abandoned on the streets of the city.  Lili is left heartbroken and begins a long search for beloved pet dog.

Hagen is subsequently caught and sold to a dog-fighter who teaches him how to fight and kill.  He becomes a bloody killer and finally escapes to gang up with 250 other dogs in the city who take revenge on the humans who had treated them so badly.

The film touches on many issues, especially about the interaction between humans and animals and the attitudes between people of different upbringings and cultures.  It is as much a symbolic film as it is emotional.

Pattaya Mail Media’s Sue Kukarja (left) poses with Hungarian Ambassador HE Dr. Peter Jakab after the screening of the film in Bangkok, Saturday, March 11.
Pattaya Mail Media’s Sue Kukarja (left) poses with Hungarian Ambassador HE Dr. Peter Jakab after the screening of the film in Bangkok, Saturday, March 11.

Half way in the pace not only turns up a notch but the plot also becomes gripping.  It’s up to your own interpretation as to whether the brutality and violence projected towards each other by both humans and animals can be justified.  “Lassie” or “Marley & Me” this isn’t.

The film is suitable for age groups of 15+ and viewing for children, especially those with pet dogs at home, should be under close supervision.

“White God” won the ‘Prize un Certain Regard’ at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival where Hagen, the dog, also won the ‘Palm Dog Award’ for best canine performance in a movie.  The film has been screened at various festivals around the world and was Hungary’s entry for the Oscars in 2014.