Hopping into a New Year

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On Monday afternoon the 24th of January if you were in Rayong, you might have thought you’d taken a wrong turn and ended up in a village somewhere in China, as the students at Garden International School welcomed in the Chinese New Year with a twitch of their ears and a wiggle in their tails by presenting an adorable assembly filled with song and dance.

The Year 1 students at GIS were all dressed in their silky red finest traditional Chinese costumes, when they began the show with a warm welcome song entitled ‘Gung Hay Fat Choy,’ which means Happy New year in Cantonese.  The children then took turns telling the story of Chinese New Year through sharing interesting facts and traditions about common New Year activities in China and throughout the world.

The Year 1 students are dressed in their silky red finest traditional Chinese costumes in their class assembly. The Year 1 students are dressed in their silky red finest traditional Chinese costumes in their class assembly.

This was then followed by a pulse quickening performance of a traditional lion dance by the students set to the echoing sounds of firecrackers and Taiko drums to officially welcome the Year of the Rabbit for this year’s Lunar New Year Celebration.

In just a few short weeks, the Year 1 team created an original script with enough parts for all the Year 1 students to be able to participate in the final performance.  They also faced the challenge of putting together costumes for the little ones in a short period of time, but succeeded in the end with much help from parents to give the final show that little something extra special.

Ricky in yr 1 takes his turn to tell a story of Chinese New Year. Ricky in yr 1 takes his turn to tell a story of Chinese New Year.

Class assemblies are a weekly occurrence here at Garden International School, in which the students in Primary and Secondary are given the chance to share highlights from their studies through performance art and celebrate both local and international holidays and festivals.

We have had such positive feedback from parents and children alike and several parents have said that their children had been singing the songs so much at home that the adults now know the words too.

The official last day of the Chinese New Year celebration was Thursday the 3rd of February, and we hope you remembered to take a moment to welcome in the Year of the Rabbit, especially if you happened to notice houses adorned with the warm red glow of paper lanterns or heard the loud crack of fireworks in the night.