Where’s my readers?

0
2666

By “readers” I don’t mean those kind souls who read my columns, but I am referring to reading glasses. I just opened my top drawer at work and there were eight pairs of readers! No, it wasn’t a “Buy 1 and get 7 free!” These were the result of wear and tear, broken side pieces, lenses missing, broken frames, unsuccessful repairs with Super Glue or Araldite (the Greek Goddess of stickiness) and the list goes on. I did, however, manage to successfully glue my finger to one lens with Super Glue. It did neither the lens, or my finger, any good at all.

I don’t need these any more!
I don’t need these any more!

A little history here, which will probably remind you of your time of decreasing visual acuity.

26 years ago I was ready to admit that my near vision was gone. Reading a map was just not possible, even holding the map in front of the headlights. A visit to the optometrist saw me leaving with suitable contact lenses which introduced a whole new world to my life. I could read the destination signs on busses and street signs ditto.

Unfortunately this Utopia was not to last. Stronger prescriptions for the contact lenses did help, but were not the answer. Remembering to remove the contacts every night was a bit hit and miss, but I always knew in the morning as the lenses were stuck to my eyeballs and everything was blurred.

I did try and remember to use a sterile technique putting the lenses in, but that too would fail regularly and I would have to do without, which suggested to me that a white stick and a Labrador was next. Of course there were also the dropped lenses with me on all fours looking for the errant bit of soft plastic.

I struggled on, but then found that my distance vision was not as good as it used to be. Recognizing faces across the street was difficult. By now I had arrived at a situation where driving at night was taking my life in my hands.

It was at this point that I discussed my vision with Dr. Somchai Trakool Choke-satian in the SuperSight surgery department at the Bangkok Hospital Pattaya.

It was at that initial consultation that I discovered that SuperSight was not just changing the lens in the eye, but a thorough eye examination to ensure that the eye itself is healthy, other than the cataracts and hardening of the natural lens. This examination takes about one hour, so it’s not a case of “Read the bottom line,” and it’s all over style exam.

Dr Somchai advised me that my eyes were suitable for the SuperSight lenses and then went on to discuss all the pros and cons of the surgery and the final results that could be expected, and then told me to go and think about it.

I did that by speaking to all the people I knew who had SuperSight surgery done before. To a man the answers were the same, “Wish I’d done it years ago”.

So a convenient date was selected for Dr. Somchai and myself and the stage was set. No turning back.

I am asked by others whether the operation was painful and I can honestly say it was not. It is a weird sensation having someone ‘inside’ your eyeball, but not painful. Under local anesthetic I found I could relax and keep my eye still as Dr. Somchai did his magic. And the results are magical. And the freedom from the glasses is wonderful.

Now two months after the operation, I still pat my pocket for the readers as I sit down in front of the computer and then realize I don’t need them. And as a funny ending, I can now wear T-shirts without a pocket for the glasses. My wardrobe has doubled! And I can finally read the numbers on the remote for the TV.

For more information contact the SuperSight surgery department at the hospital, they are nice people. Telephone 1719.