Hearing pioneer sends loud warning at BHP seminar

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Dr. Sujittra Prasansuk, director of Bangkok Hospital Pattaya’s Ear, Nose & Throat Center, tells doctors and nurses at the Oct. 16 workshop how people need to moderate use of technology to preserve their hearing into later years.
Dr. Sujittra Prasansuk, director of Bangkok Hospital Pattaya’s Ear, Nose & Throat Center, tells doctors and nurses at the Oct. 16 workshop how people need to moderate use of technology to preserve their hearing into later years.

Today’s noisy world poses dangers for people’s hearing, a pioneer in treating hearing problems in Thailand told a seminar at Bangkok Hospital Pattaya.

Dr. Sujittra Prasansuk, director of the hospital’s Ear, Nose & Throat Center, told doctors and nurses at the Oct. 16 workshop that people need to moderate use of technology to preserve their hearing into later years.

While at Siriraj hospital in 1973, Sujittra pioneered the use of modern technology to diagnose and treat patients with hearing loss and balance issues. Today she leads the BHP center to care for and rehabilitate patients with not only hearing and balance impairment, but tinnitus, vertigo and speaking problems in children.

“Currently, people live with noise pollution that is louder than our ears are supposed to sustain, which is 70 decibels,” she said. Moreover, younger generations are addicted to music players, telephone, computers and karaoke.

She recommends that tech users listen at volumes no greater than 50 percent of the device’s capabilities and not listen for more than an hour at one time. They also should avoid loud places for extended periods.

Surprisingly, Sujittra also cautioned against aggressive exercise, saying aerobics or other high-intensity exercise, if not done correctly, can cause vertigo or other hearing issues.

She told the medical professionals that ears should only be cleaned with cloth and only on the outer ear. People should avoid deep cleaning, as it can damage the inner ear.

The center, Sujittra said, does hearing screenings for newborns that takes only five minutes. If any impairment is suspected, further testing can be arranged.